Electric Car charging Connectors : Explained At WeeklyMotor

By Max Anthony •  Updated: 03/03/21 •  3 min read

The standardization of electric car charging connectors is a discussion that, for some time now, has yielded cloth for the sleeve. European manufacturers advocate the use of one, while North Americans, Japanese, and Chinese opt for other plugs. Thus, the parsley is formed in the head of those who want to buy an electrified one.

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In order to answer some doubts of those who want to purchase an electric vehicle, but are afraid of being on the street, we show the different types of electric car charging connectors. It is worth mentioning that, currently, it is possible to circumvent connectivity with, for example, adapters. However, it is good to be connected to the possibilities, right?

Check Out The Different Types Of Electric Car Charging Connectors

SAE Type 1
electric car charging connectors

This five-pin connector is standard in the United States and Canada, and can also be found in first-generation versions of the Nissan Leaf, Chevrolet Volt, and Kia Soul EV. In Europe, it was replaced by SAE Type 2. Also called SAE J1772, the charger has a single-phase voltage of 120V or 240V and a power of up to 19.2 kW.

SAE Type 2
electric car charging connectors

It is the most common type in Europe with a seven-pin plug – and therefore also around here. Like Type 1, it was developed for slow or fast refills. However, it was made for single-phase and three-phase systems between 250V and 400V. Another differential of Type 2 compared to 1 is that the connector can be locked in the car. That way, there is no risk that someone will disconnect the vehicle while the driver does not see.

CCS Type 1
electric car charging connectors

The Combined Charging System (CCS) Type 1 is an evolution of SAE Type 1 and the most popular type of fast recharge. Most new purely electric models have this socket. It combines the last five pins with a DC connector below the AC plugs. Thus, the system is backward compatible with service stations that offer recharging in alternating current. The CCS Type 1 has a maximum power of 125 kW between 200V and 600V.

CCS Type 2
electric car charging connectors

The CCS Type 2 is nothing more than an evolution of the SAE Type 2, with seven pins and two inputs for direct current. The system has maximum power and 170 kW and supports up to 850V. Like the CCS Type 1, it is backward compatible with stations that have SAE Type 2 sockets.

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GB / T
electric car charging connectors

The Chinese standard has two versions. One is of alternating current, with a voltage between 220V and 440V. It has a maximum power of up to 14.08 kW. The other is direct current and provides up to 187.5 kW of power between 400V and 750V. The system uses, unlike Type 2, male plugs on the cable and female plugs on the vehicle. 

ChaDeMO
electric car charging connectors

The Japanese standard ChaDeMO (“Charge De Move”) was one of the first DC fast charging systems. Dated 2010, it is still widely used by manufacturers in the Asian country. The system requires two separate plugs for fast and slow recharging, a ChaDeMO, and socket that can be Type 1 or Type 2.

The connector has a maximum power of 60kW and a voltage of 500V. It is capable of carrying electrical current in two directions and, in practice, can transfer energy from the car to, for example, your home. 

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Max Anthony

Max is a gizmo-savvy guy, who has a tendency to get pulled into the nitty gritty details of technology and cars. He attended UT Austin, where he studied Information Science. He’s married and has three kids, one dog and a GMC truck and a Porsche 911. With a large family, he still finds time to share tips and tricks on cars, trucks and more.